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#16: 09-24-2012, 08:21 AM
 
 cipher_nemo
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Location: State College, PA
Car: 2011 Legacy 2.5i Pr, RRP
Posts: 142
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4-Gauge Amp Power

Disconnecting the battery, checking grounds, etc. Old-school metal stool/chair rubber feet do a great job of protecting the battery posts from being accidentally shorted...


This is the stock positive connector. They coated it in a conductive goo that's probably there to protect it against corrosion and oxidation. Since this is only a temporary item for me, I removed the goo with mineral spirits and used a Scoth Bright pad to clean the contact area. In my second phase of the install, I will be replacing the battery and using Stinger terminals. So this is just temporary...


Cleaned the positive connectors that go from the positive into the fuse box...


4-gauge amp power cable attached to the ring terminal and protective plastic hood cut crudely to fit. The hood is only temporary for this phase of the build, so I didn't bother making an exact cut...


Here's the underside of the fuse box's cover. I drilled two holes (slightly smaller than the bolts I used), screwed in the bolts to give it a thread, and added washers. Always attach something to the fuse box from the bottom-up to ensure you don't drill into or interfere with the tall relays. Finally I sealed it with clear nail polish. The polish dries fast, helps keep the threaded bolts stationary, and keeps out moisture. Nail polish is one of the few women's cosmetics that us guys can actually use for everyday shop stuff. ...


Top of the fuse box with the two bolts sticking out. I added rubber washers to keep out water, then used rubber cement to mount a cut piece of scrap rubber I had laying around. The rubber mat is the same thickness as the rubber washers...


Power wire and fuse mounted, ready to be sleeved...


Power cable runs through a stock rubber grommet. I removed the grommet, drilled a hole the size of the wire (which doesn't remove all the rubber of that hole size), then inserted the wire and feed it through the hole. There is a lot of firewall stuffing (insulation) behind that hole, so make sure to move it aside or tear a hole in it before feeding the wire through. This hole is pretty high in the dash, so it helps to use a large, heavy cable that falls to the floor inside the cabin. If you're using a smaller cable, attach a weight to it first...


Sleeved, 4-gauge power cable and fuseblock. I used Techflex Flexo F6 sleeving, nylon wire ties, and heat-shrink wrap to finish the ends. It's mostly for looks, but it offers some mild protection. The F6 does not have a high temp rating (257F continuous temp, 482F melt point), but it's plenty for being away from the engine area. For the Big 3 wire install I'll do in a later phase, I'll use Techflex Liquid L6 instead...


4-gauge and remote wires running through trim on the driver's side. I terminated the remote wire with a quick-disconnect end right at that plastic bulk of connectors near the top of the photos. I put heat shrink around it to protect it. So when I'm ready to install the head unit, I don't have to go far for the remote cable. I don't want to run it all the way to the dash yet. The 4-gauge fit nicely in the first two stock wire harness clips, but I had to run it further inside the trim for the 3rd and later clips since a second bundle of wires meets there...


Backside of driver's side B Pillar trim panel...


Backside of driver's side corner trim kick panel. Notice the direction of the mounts. To remove this you should remove the plastic plug/clip at the far corner first, then pull the bottom of the panel towards you (out), then push up at the top of panel to remove the last clip. This is truly my most hated panel that I had to remove. For my first removal, it was a learning experience and I ended up breaking off a small piece of the pink mounting clip for the top portion (the side that rests in the car's body). But it didn't ruin it, as I just rotated the clip a little and it still works fine...


I'm a little sore today from crawling around in my corner figuring out how I wanted to run these cables, and taking off panels, etc. But a Kobalt (Lowe's brand) Kneeling Panel saved my knees!...


Last edited by cipher_nemo; 09-24-2012 at 08:26 AM..