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-   -   Noob question: What is the ideal tire pressure for a 2005 LGT? (http://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php?t=197967)

rexva 12-12-2012 10:43 AM

Noob question: What is the ideal tire pressure for a 2005 LGT?
 
Stock wheels, 215/45R-17 Bridgestone Potenza G019 Grid tires.

I was reading this thread: http://legacygt.com/forums/showthrea...gei-54263.html

And it seems like there are a lot of different opinions on this.

It often looks to me like my tires are a little low (sidewalls pushing out tiny bit) but I don't really know how much of that is normal/expected.

So... what do y'all think?

laff79 12-12-2012 11:08 AM

50 all around























jk

c-lo 12-12-2012 11:20 AM

open your door. look down to the left on the door jam. read;)

iNVAR 12-12-2012 12:55 PM

35/33 F/R cold iniflation, meaning your car has sat overnight, in the shade (or garage) and you check it before they have a chance to warm up.

you can overinflate a tiny bit if you want, but i would strongly suggest you not go lower than the 35/33 F/R recommended.

i personally do 37/35.

Mr. Sinister 12-12-2012 03:26 PM

I'd go between +2 -> +4 F/R over OEM recommendation.

rexva 12-13-2012 12:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iNVAR (Post 4199639)
35/33 F/R cold iniflation, meaning your car has sat overnight, in the shade (or garage) and you check it before they have a chance to warm up.

you can overinflate a tiny bit if you want, but i would strongly suggest you not go lower than the 35/33 F/R recommended.

i personally do 37/35.

This probably sounds very stupid, but bear with me...

I take the pressure "cold", say in the morning, and it's low.

So I drive to the gas station to use the air machine... now they are warm. So how do I know what pressure is right?

BarManBean 12-13-2012 12:51 PM

Buy a compressor. That's really the only way to actually fill them up "cold".

Where are you at in NOVA, anyway?

road race legacy 12-13-2012 12:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rexva (Post 4201929)
This probably sounds very stupid, but bear with me...

I take the pressure "cold", say in the morning, and it's low.

So I drive to the gas station to use the air machine... now they are warm. So how do I know what pressure is right?

When you get to the gas station put 5psi over the recommended pressure. Check them the next morning. If its too much take some out. If its still low go back to the gas station and add some more.

iNVAR 12-13-2012 12:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rexva (Post 4201929)
This probably sounds very stupid, but bear with me...

I take the pressure "cold", say in the morning, and it's low.

So I drive to the gas station to use the air machine... now they are warm. So how do I know what pressure is right?

Quote:

Originally Posted by BarManBean (Post 4201934)
Buy a compressor. That's really the only way to actually fill them up "cold".

Where are you at in NOVA, anyway?

Compressor is the best way, even just a portable pump is fine, but what I used to do before I got one is this:
1) Check pressure. Let's say you're looking to get 35/33 and you're currently reading 33/31. That means you're down 2 PSI all around, right?

2) Drive to the gas station. Hopefully it's pretty close by.

3) Check the pressure again. It'll probably be reading 35/33 or something like that by now. Make a note of the new pressure and add 2 to it. So in other words, after you arrive at the gas station, you're reading 35/33. Fill your tires to 37/35 instead because remember, you were missing 2 PSI before. If you're not sure, you should add some more air in because it's always better to overinflate a bit. You can always let air back out without a pump!!

4) The next day, after the car is completely cool, check the pressure again. Hopefully it's on target. If it's too high, let out some air to the appropriate target pressure. This is why I said to overinflate a bit to be sure. You can always let out the air now.

:)

Claw 12-13-2012 09:22 PM

Build yourself one of these to ensure both sides are the same..

http://fixbroke.tumblr.com/day/2012/11/16

TheOneDoubleN 12-13-2012 09:29 PM

Buy a freaking bicycle pump and keep it in your trunk along with a pressure gauge, that's what I've done for years, works perfectly for adjustments. ~15-25 pumps = ~2-4 psi.

With regard to what psi to run, run whatever feels good to you that's at least the factory recommended, and at most the max cold psi stamped on the side of the tire (though that will probably feel absurdly stiff).

Air it up to factory spec and play in 2psi increments to find something you like. Depending on the tire, I've run anywhere from 31-45psi (Continental Extreme Contact DW's have absurdly soft sidewalls)

NWSPECB 12-13-2012 09:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by c-lo (Post 4199372)
open your door. look down to the left on the door jam. read;)

This only works if you are sitting in your car. If you open your door from the outside, it will be on the right.

rexva 12-14-2012 06:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BarManBean (Post 4201934)
Buy a compressor. That's really the only way to actually fill them up "cold".

Where are you at in NOVA, anyway?

Near Tysons Corner

Quote:

Originally Posted by road race legacy (Post 4201944)
When you get to the gas station put 5psi over the recommended pressure. Check them the next morning. If its too much take some out. If its still low go back to the gas station and add some more.

Got it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by iNVAR (Post 4201947)
Compressor is the best way, even just a portable pump is fine, but what I used to do before I got one is this:
1) Check pressure. Let's say you're looking to get 35/33 and you're currently reading 33/31. That means you're down 2 PSI all around, right?

2) Drive to the gas station. Hopefully it's pretty close by.

3) Check the pressure again. It'll probably be reading 35/33 or something like that by now. Make a note of the new pressure and add 2 to it. So in other words, after you arrive at the gas station, you're reading 35/33. Fill your tires to 37/35 instead because remember, you were missing 2 PSI before. If you're not sure, you should add some more air in because it's always better to overinflate a bit. You can always let air back out without a pump!!

4) The next day, after the car is completely cool, check the pressure again. Hopefully it's on target. If it's too high, let out some air to the appropriate target pressure. This is why I said to overinflate a bit to be sure. You can always let out the air now.

:)

Station is about 1.5 miles away, so I'll give this a shot.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Claw (Post 4203040)
Build yourself one of these to ensure both sides are the same..

http://fixbroke.tumblr.com/day/2012/11/16

LOL

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheOneDoubleN (Post 4203048)
Buy a freaking bicycle pump and keep it in your trunk along with a pressure gauge, that's what I've done for years, works perfectly for adjustments. ~15-25 pumps = ~2-4 psi.

With regard to what psi to run, run whatever feels good to you that's at least the factory recommended, and at most the max cold psi stamped on the side of the tire (though that will probably feel absurdly stiff).

Air it up to factory spec and play in 2psi increments to find something you like. Depending on the tire, I've run anywhere from 31-45psi (Continental Extreme Contact DW's have absurdly soft sidewalls)

I have a top notch bicycle pump that actually has a gauge. Somehow I never thought to try this, I just assumped it was not powerful enough to inflate a car tire... D'oh.

Quote:

Originally Posted by NWSPECB (Post 4203051)
This only works if you are sitting in your car. If you open your door from the outside, it will be on the right.

:lol:

TheOneDoubleN 12-14-2012 07:43 AM

Well it isn't useful for inflating a flat tire, but perfect for adjustments. The gauges on bike pumps aren't accurate enough to measure a 1-2 psi change so I would still buy a separate gauge.

RabidWombat 01-02-2013 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rexva (Post 4203331)
I have a top notch bicycle pump that actually has a gauge. Somehow I never thought to try this, I just assumped it was not powerful enough to inflate a car tire... D'oh.

I use a bike pump all the time. Standard (cig lighter) electric compressors suck above 35psi, and the bike pump doesn't even notice. I just use the gauge on the pump, its fast and right there. Its more important that the tires are uniformly inflated than EXACTLY the right pressure, so the bike gauge is fine.

Its a bit of a work-out adding ~5psi to 4 tires, but it only takes about 10 minutes.


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