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-   -   Newb wanting to detail his car for the first time (http://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php?t=195614)

root_galaxy 10-30-2012 08:59 PM

Newb wanting to detail his car for the first time
 
Hey guys,

I just picked up an 09 QSM LGT that I am wanting to do some sort of detail basically to clean it and prep it for this winter. Now I've read up on some threads and Have an idea of what I'm going to be doing but i don't have polishing wheels or a buffer and am going to be trying everything by hand. I guess what I'm looking for is some guidance on some good quality products that I can use on the inside/ outside that'll give me what I'm looking for. I'd like to condition the leather on the inside as well as treat the trim but I'm not sure which conditioner to use, again I'm not looking for perfection but something that will give me my monies worth.
As far as exterior, I'm going to be using this kit:

Ultimate Kit

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, also I'm in CO so would like to protect the car from all the winter road crap.

OCDetails 10-31-2012 09:38 AM

That kit is a pretty good deal, but I would skip the wash with wax. If you use that then the Liquid Wax won't bond properly. It isn't actually a 'wax'. It is a polymer sealant and polymers don't bond with oily waxed surfaces, so definitely don't use the two products together for the first time. After you have waxed the car then you can use the wash with wax, but definitely not before.

There really isn't a good leather conditioner on the shelf that I would recommend. If you are interested in taking care of your leather, then I would spend a few dollars more and order it online. I've honestly not used anything off the shelf that I would even use to condition the leather on my $h!t kicker boots. Leather is important to care for properly and wasting money on something that does no good for it just doesn't make sense.

I'm pretty sure I've got a winter prep thread here somewhere, but I put it on my site too just in case. That should point you in the right direction for winter prep. As far as just basic detailing that you can do off the shelves, I'm certain that is discussed around here as well. Take a look at some of the stuff on my site and you might get a little more specific help, but be warned that most of the best stuff for your car is something you are going to have to order online. There are also several places in Colorado that either are distributors for car care products or they are the manufacturer. Adam's is in Colorado somewhere. There is another big one out there too, but I can't for the life of me remember their name. Most of the suppliers are either in California, Nevada, Colorado, or Florida it seems. Anyway, with so many of them being local, I'm sure you would be able to get a much better selection of products by doing a little google search on detail shops in your area that may have products on hand to sell. Most of the real shops are distributors. Call Adam's and see if they have any distributors. I've heard their stuff is awesome, but I've never had a chance to use too much of it. http://www.adamspolishes.com/

peterjurgen 10-31-2012 04:04 PM

Hey Buddy,
I'd start with a clay bar kit
http://www.meguiarsdirect.com/product_detail.do?q=4579&promoCode=MEGFGS49WEBPAYP C&kw={keyword}&gclid=CODKmMOgrLMCFfBcMgodb10AkA
and then wax it right after
http://www.meguiars.com/en/automotiv...ech-waxreg-20/
It'll take some time but it will make you fall in love with your car all over again.
If there are light scratches you can use a polish after the claybar and then follow up with some wax.
Cheers

root_galaxy 10-31-2012 08:10 PM

ItTE=OCDetails;4137718]That kit is a pretty good deal, but I would skip the wash with wax. If you use that then the Liquid Wax won't bond properly. It isn't actually a 'wax'. It is a polymer sealant and polymers don't bond with oily waxed surfaces, so definitely don't use the two products together for the first time. After you have waxed the car then you can use the wash with wax, but definitely not before.

There really isn't a good leather conditioner on the shelf that I would recommend. If you are interested in taking care of your leather, then I would spend a few dollars more and order it online. I've honestly not used anything off the shelf that I would even use to condition the leather on my $h!t kicker boots. Leather is important to care for properly and wasting money on something that does no good for it just doesn't make sense.

I'm pretty sure I've got a winter prep thread here somewhere, but I put it on my site too just in case. That should point you in the right direction for winter prep. As far as just basic detailing that you can do off the shelves, I'm certain that is discussed around here as well. Take a look at some of the stuff on my site and you might get a little more specific help, but be warned that most of the best stuff for your car is something you are going to have to order online. There are also several places in Colorado that either are distributors for car care products or they are the manufacturer. Adam's is in Colorado somewhere. There is another big one out there too, but I can't for the life of me remember their name. Most of the suppliers are either in California, Nevada, Colorado, or Florida it seems. Anyway, with so many of them being local, I'm sure you would be able to get a much better selection of products by doing a little google search on detail shops in your area that may have products on hand to sell. Most of the real shops are distributors. Call Adam's and see if they have any distributors. I've heard their stuff is awesome, but I've never had a chance to use too much of it. http://www.adamspolishes.com/[/QUOTE]

You my friend are the best, I will definitely be stopping by there soon. I've never waxed or polished a car so this being the first time, it is a bit Intimidating though. What leather product do you recommend and also, any key beginner steps to do/avoid when Polishing my car?

blongo804 10-31-2012 08:16 PM

Like OCD said, check out www.adamspolishes.com. Everything I use on my car comes from there and their leather conditioner is awesome. I can go on for days on how great their products are.

root_galaxy 10-31-2012 09:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blongo804 (Post 4138720)
Like OCD said, check out www.adamspolishes.com. Everything I use on my car comes from there and their leather conditioner is awesome. I can go on for days on how great their products are.

Nice, that's reassuring thank you! Even better that they're pretty local to me:spin:

OCDetails 11-01-2012 09:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by root_galaxy (Post 4138711)

You my friend are the best, I will definitely be stopping by there soon. I've never waxed or polished a car so this being the first time, it is a bit Intimidating though. What leather product do you recommend and also, any key beginner steps to do/avoid when Polishing my car?

Those first three articles you see on my site will likely help out a lot. I get pretty specific on the how to part of using different products and tools. I know it is kind of a lot to read, but it will probably give you a better idea of what you don't know and what you might need more help with. Or it could reaffirm to you that you absolutely have the skills needed and you are good to go. :)

Adam's only has one leather cleaner and one conditioner, so those are the ones I would recommend. Always always always try to use a conditioner that is in a liquid or gel form. Leather is just skin basically. If your skin was super dried out, would you want a spritz of something to moisturize them or would you want a big blob of lotion? Leather is the same way. Avoid any spray conditioners if you can. Spray cleaners are fine, but how much lotion and conditioner could really be in a spray? The lotions are definitely better. Gels are even better because they don't fill up the perforations.

That is another good point. When applying the leather conditioner be sure to go light on any area with perforations. Apply the conditioner to the applicator you are using and wipe it on the solid pieces of leather first and then go over the perforations after most of the conditioner is already used on other areas. Keep a toothpick handy to clean up any that gets in the perforations, but if you are careful then you should be able to avoid it. Poorboy's Leather Stuff is my favorite conditioner for perforated leather simply because it is a gel and doesn't go in the holes as easily as the typical lotion. Anyway, just be careful and you'll be fine. :)

root_galaxy 11-02-2012 07:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OCDetails (Post 4139180)
Those first three articles you see on my site will likely help out a lot. I get pretty specific on the how to part of using different products and tools. I know it is kind of a lot to read, but it will probably give you a better idea of what you don't know and what you might need more help with. Or it could reaffirm to you that you absolutely have the skills needed and you are good to go. :)

Adam's only has one leather cleaner and one conditioner, so those are the ones I would recommend. Always always always try to use a conditioner that is in a liquid or gel form. Leather is just skin basically. If your skin was super dried out, would you want a spritz of something to moisturize them or would you want a big blob of lotion? Leather is the same way. Avoid any spray conditioners if you can. Spray cleaners are fine, but how much lotion and conditioner could really be in a spray? The lotions are definitely better. Gels are even better because they don't fill up the perforations.

That is another good point. When applying the leather conditioner be sure to go light on any area with perforations. Apply the conditioner to the applicator you are using and wipe it on the solid pieces of leather first and then go over the perforations after most of the conditioner is already used on other areas. Keep a toothpick handy to clean up any that gets in the perforations, but if you are careful then you should be able to avoid it. Poorboy's Leather Stuff is my favorite conditioner for perforated leather simply because it is a gel and doesn't go in the holes as easily as the typical lotion. Anyway, just be careful and you'll be fine. :)

Thanks for all the help and advice! I took your advice and stopped by Adam's yesterday and let me tell you, they are running a slick oiled machine over there. I'll write up a more detailed review once I get a chance to use everything I purchased but basically I get there and I'm greeted right away. Then the sales and marketing guy comes out from the back and starts asking me questions right away about everything and starts forming a picture of what we're looking at. He goes through the products that he recommends for me and asks if I want to put together a kit. He actually took one of their preexisting kits and modifies it for me, substituting a couple products for others more tailored to what I am going to be needing. On top of everything, he gives me a discount off the total price that I never asked for! Once we got done putting the order together, he asks me if I would like a tour of the shop while they pull everything for me and gives me the tour. I am very pleased and happy with the customer service I received, even though I am just a beginner trying to get into this whole detailing thing, he treated me like a long time customer of a huge client of their's and explained everything to me. Anyone who needs detailing supplies, go to Adam's, you will not be let :icon_cheedown


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