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-   -   Brake Bleed Order????? (http://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php?t=194477)

GTEASER 10-09-2012 05:53 PM

Brake Bleed Order?????
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hey everyone! A while back I ran across the image below in someone's post showing a particular order in which the brakes need to be bled on Subaru's with ABS. It is attached below.

Attachment 131029


Curiously, the Subaru Factory Service Manual simply states in the Air Bleeding Section (pg BR-55, 2012 manual) that the bleeding sequence should start at the wheel farthest from the brake master cylinder, working closer to the master cylinder with each subsequent wheel.

Which is correct?

In the past I have always done this as specified in the manual, but at the same time I have not performed this on any vehicle with ABS. Help!

nadracer 10-09-2012 06:26 PM

I've never done it myself but everything I've read about how to do it yes thats is the consensus. Start on the furthest wheel, bleed until the fluid is clear, add more fluid repeat.



Quote:

Originally Posted by GTEASER (Post 4107763)
Hey everyone! A while back I ran across the image below in someone's post showing a particular order in which the brakes need to be bled on Subaru's with ABS. It is attached below.

Attachment 131029


Curiously, the Subaru Factory Service Manual simply states in the Air Bleeding Section (pg BR-55, 2012 manual) that the bleeding sequence should start at the wheel farthest from the brake master cylinder, working closer to the master cylinder with each subsequent wheel.

Which is correct?

In the past I have always done this as specified in the manual, but at the same time I have not performed this on any vehicle with ABS. Help!


minuccims 10-09-2012 07:00 PM

I've followed the guidance in the manual - furthest to closest from the MC.

GTEASER 10-10-2012 09:44 AM

So where did that little diagram come from? Anyone remember seeing it here?

ehsnils 10-11-2012 05:33 AM

I would say that it really doesn't matter which order you do it, just make sure that you check every wheel and it's usually a good idea to take a second round after the first.

BAC5.2 10-11-2012 06:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ehsnils (Post 4109957)
I would say that it really doesn't matter which order you do it, just make sure that you check every wheel and it's usually a good idea to take a second round after the first.

This. It doesn't really matter what order you bleed in.

You'll need to cycle the ABS in order to bleed out the fluid in the ABS unit. Just once is fine, the little bit of fluid left in the system isn't going to hurt anything.

GTEASER 10-11-2012 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ehsnils (Post 4109957)
I would say that it really doesn't matter which order you do it, just make sure that you check every wheel and it's usually a good idea to take a second round after the first.

I always do 2 rounds with a full flush, and especially when replacing brake lines or calipers.




Quote:

Originally Posted by BAC5.2 (Post 4109973)
This. It doesn't really matter what order you bleed in.

You'll need to cycle the ABS in order to bleed out the fluid in the ABS unit. Just once is fine, the little bit of fluid left in the system isn't going to hurt anything.

What do you mean by "cycling" the ABS control unit?

CL21376 10-11-2012 09:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GTEASER (Post 4110228)

What do you mean by "cycling" the ABS control unit?

Go out and engage ABS breaking.

GTEASER 10-11-2012 10:07 AM

So bleed the brakes, take the car off the jackstands, drive fast, stop fast to utilize ABS, put the car back up and bleed more fluid thru the system?

BAC5.2 10-11-2012 01:35 PM

That's the dangerous way.

The other way is to take the car to a dealer who has an SSM and can cycle the ABS controller with the car on the lift.

GTEASER 10-11-2012 01:38 PM

What is a SSM? And should I just have the dealer do the full flush after driving it very very carefully to them. Will doing it the dangerous way cycle things properly as long as I find a safe place to do the dangerous?

shadowsports 10-11-2012 01:47 PM

SSM= Subaru Select Monitor ... but I do it dangerously myself.

BAC5.2 10-11-2012 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GTEASER (Post 4110718)
What is a SSM? And should I just have the dealer do the full flush after driving it very very carefully to them. Will doing it the dangerous way cycle things properly as long as I find a safe place to do the dangerous?

Under NO circumstance should you do brake work where you crack the lines and drive the car without having bled the brakes.

GTEASER 10-11-2012 02:42 PM

^^^Whoa!!! I'm not a moron. It sounds like you think I would expect my brakes to work with the lines either "cracked open" or without bleeding. I used to work as a mechanic and crew member on several SCCA GT3 and GT4 teams, and I worked at an engine/chassis shop building race cars. Excuse me for never working on a car with ABS, just not sure of, and never seen a diagram of, the ABS unit. If I had it my way, I would not choose the ABS option, but we can thank paternalistic government, and idiot drivers who don't know how to control their cars, for requiring manufacturers to add expensive safety stuff that some of us don't want, jacking up the price of cars for everyone.

I will install SS braided brake lines, bleed the brakes, properly, before I drive it, and I will cycle the ABS on a nice safe back road somewhere, and I will bleed the brakes again. Not gonna pay the dealer when I have other mods to try to afford as well.

Thank you for cluing me into the "cycling" thing, I do appreciate it. To get a second, I just called a local race shop and the guy that runs the shop cycles his, the "dangerous" way with his Corvette track day car.

And thank you Shadow for informing me what SSM stands for....

ehsnils 10-11-2012 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BAC5.2 (Post 4110714)
That's the dangerous way.

The other way is to take the car to a dealer who has an SSM and can cycle the ABS controller with the car on the lift.

Just find a large gravel area or gravel road. That way you won't have any problems getting the ABS working and still be reasonably safe.


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