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-   -   Best settings for HK stereo (http://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php?t=130042)

mark30pwr 01-30-2010 01:22 PM

Best settings for HK stereo
 
Lets work together to find the best settings for the Harman Kardon stereo system.

Please help in your responses by being clear and listing all the settings. Or take a photo and post the photo of the equalizer settings.

Here's what I've come up with as my best first attempt at this:

Band: Freq, Q, Gain
Band 1: 120 Hz, 1, 3 dB
Band 2: 500 Hz, 2, -2 dB
Band 3: 2.5k Hz, 1, -1 dB
Band 4: 10k Hz, 0.5, 1 dB
Surround: Bypass (default).
Balance and Fade: 0 and 0 (default).

morgan 01-30-2010 03:37 PM

how do you get to settings on a 2010 2.5i limited w/ hk system

mark30pwr 01-30-2010 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by morgan (Post 2807947)
how do you get to settings on a 2010 2.5i limited w/ hk system

I think it goes something like this... When listening to music, push the right knob of the radio, then use the touch screen and select 'settings,' then use the touch screen to select 'Equalizer.' After that you can play with the settings in Band 1, 2, 3, and 4.

musty_hustla 01-30-2010 08:45 PM

I think you are referring to the navigation equipped models. The normal H/K has only base, middle, and treble.

coppertone 01-30-2010 09:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by musty_hustla (Post 2808211)
i think you are referring to the navigation equipped models. The normal h/k has only base, middle, and treble.

x2

mark30pwr 01-31-2010 12:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by musty_hustla (Post 2808211)
I think you are referring to the navigation equipped models. The normal H/K has only base, middle, and treble.

Yes, that is what I was referring to.

mark30pwr 02-01-2010 11:03 PM

I discovered a better setting with fuller sound including more bass. This is the best I've found so far. Music sounds very nice at all volume levels.

Band: Freq, Q, Gain
Band 1: 120 Hz, 1, 5 dB
Band 2: 500 Hz, 2, -1 dB
Band 3: 2.5k Hz, 1, 0 dB
Band 4: 10k Hz, 0.5, 2 dB
Surround: Bypass (default)
Balance and Fade: 0 and 0 (default)

coppertone 02-02-2010 05:18 AM

perfect

SuBiElOvEr 02-02-2010 11:56 AM

Can someone explain what the Q is?

minuccims 02-02-2010 07:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SuBiElOvEr (Post 2811447)
Can someone explain what the Q is?

For an equalizer, it defines how sharp the rolloff is from the center frequency. The higher Q (red) has a narrow band, while the lower Q (blue) has a greater bandwith with gentler rolloff. There will be more overlap from an adjacent band with a lower Q. It tells how "wide" the affected area is when you raise/lower EQ band level cut for a particular center frequency. If an EQ with a low Q (e.g. the blue graph) is raised then surrounding frequencies (because of a wider bandwidth) are raised as well. As the Q goes up the bandwidth narrows. Think of a 3-band EQ having low Q and an 11-band EQ having a much higher Q.



For a radio, the tuner would require a very high Q to isolate adjacent channels.

The Q of a speaker shows how resonant the driver (or driver-enclosure combination) is. The rule of thumb is that big magnets and big enclosures give a low Q. The lower the Q, the more tightly does the magnet control the movement of the cone, whereas a very high Q driver would not and occillate at resonance. When a speaker is installed in an enclosure, the resonant frequency changes and so does the Q.

SuBiElOvEr 02-02-2010 08:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by minuccims (Post 2812132)
For an equalizer, it defines how sharp the rolloff is from the center frequency. The higher Q (red) has a narrow band, while the lower Q (blue) has a greater bandwith with gentler rolloff. There will be more overlap from an adjacent band with a lower Q. It tells how "wide" the affected area is when you raise/lower EQ band level cut for a particular center frequency. If an EQ with a low Q (e.g. the blue graph) is raised then surrounding frequencies (because of a wider bandwidth) are raised as well. As the Q goes up the bandwidth narrows. Think of a 3-band EQ having low Q and an 11-band EQ having a much higher Q.



For a radio, the tuner would require a very high Q to isolate adjacent channels.

The Q of a speaker shows how resonant the driver (or driver-enclosure combination) is. The rule of thumb is that big magnets and big enclosures give a low Q. The lower the Q, the more tightly does the magnet control the movement of the cone, whereas a very high Q driver would not and occillate at resonance. When a speaker is installed in an enclosure, the resonant frequency changes and so does the Q.

Thank you very much for that very detailed explanation. Appreciate it.:spin::spin:

Highway Star 02-03-2010 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by minuccims (Post 2812132)
For an equalizer, it defines how sharp the rolloff is from the center frequency.

That was a great concise explanation. Now how do I apply it to this system? Do I want a low Q for a broader rolloff and smooth transition from one band to the next or a high Q for a clear distinction between two adjacent bands? Can the Q be too high and leave gaps between the band settings?

minuccims 02-04-2010 07:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Highway Star (Post 2814002)
That was a great concise explanation. Now how do I apply it to this system? Do I want a low Q for a broader rolloff and smooth transition from one band to the next or a high Q for a clear distinction between two adjacent bands? Can the Q be too high and leave gaps between the band settings?


Thinking out loud ... Well adjacent bands have overlap so a very low Q across adjacent band would end up like you had little separation control over these bands. You would have to put more/less gain to make an audible difference. A high Q would be make more of a peak/loss in a narrower band around the center freq, and not influencing the adjacent band.

On your stereo, the center freq of each band is never equally spaced e.g 500Hz, 1000Hz, 1500Hz,... because the lower frequencies have more power per hertz than higher frequencies. (Think of a subwoofer shaking the house; not so with higher freqs) So, ideally, the bands are set up to have the same amount of power in each band. Now use gain and adjustments to influence the sound of each band.

The post from mark30pwr had these settings:
Band: Freq, Q, Gain
Band 1: 120 Hz, 1, 5 dB
Band 2: 500 Hz, 2, -1 dB
Band 3: 2.5k Hz, 1, 0 dB
Band 4: 10k Hz, 0.5, 2 dB

Notice the non linear, (logarithmic) relationship between the bands, This is so there the power in each band is similar.

The Q/gain settings: Our ears and our stock speakers are not efficient at the low frequency (and we like bass), so the lowest band is boosted +5. The Q=1 will boost above the 120 hz center and bleed into the 2nd band. The high Q and attenuated gain in the second band limits this bandís contribution. Band 1 and band 3 will bleeding into band 2, with band 2 having a minor bump around 500 hz because of the higher Q. But the bump is attenuated so it blend in with the 1st and 3rd bandís contribution into band2. The 5th band, the widest, has gain with a low Q. This keeps the gain across the band fairly wide across the whole band. A picture would be best but donít have the time.

So he has created the classic ROCK equalizer setting (High base, low mid, high upper mid/treble) but has used both the gain and Q settings to extend (low Q) and limit (higher Q) the extent of the gains to achieve the response provides a smoother transition across the bands and to maybe compensate for the speakers response as well.

TheMadcap 02-05-2010 06:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mark30pwr (Post 2810844)
I discovered a better setting with fuller sound including more bass. This is the best I've found so far. Music sounds very nice at all volume levels.

Band: Freq, Q, Gain
Band 1: 120 Hz, 1, 5 dB
Band 2: 500 Hz, 2, -1 dB
Band 3: 2.5k Hz, 1, 0 dB
Band 4: 10k Hz, 0.5, 2 dB
Surround: Bypass (default)
Balance and Fade: 0 and 0 (default)

I set up my system with these settings yesterday and I found it sounded great with MP3s and CDs but the radio sounded like it was in a muffler. I changed the Surround to Matrix and now the whole system sounds awesome for both radio and MP3s.

Excellent work figuring out those EQ settings!

rexster 02-05-2010 01:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mark30pwr (Post 2807847)
Lets work together to find the best settings for the Harman Kardon stereo system.

Please help in your responses by being clear and listing all the settings. Or take a photo and post the photo of the equalizer settings.

Here's what I've come up with as my best first attempt at this:

Band: Freq, Q, Gain
Band 1: 120 Hz, 1, 3 dB
Band 2: 500 Hz, 2, -2 dB
Band 3: 2.5k Hz, 1, -1 dB
Band 4: 10k Hz, 0.5, 1 dB
Surround: Bypass (default).
Balance and Fade: 0 and 0 (default).

'The best' is highly subjective. Do you really think you'll be able to agree on one setting for all users and all music?


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